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Best Antidepressant for Acid Reflux (GERD) and Gastritis

Best Antidepressant for Acid Reflux

The best antidepressant for acid reflux and gastritis is the one that is least likely to cause the release of stomach acid and does not have any effect on the upper esophageal sphincter.

Functional GI diseases are diseases of the gut-brain interaction. It is a collection of illnesses characterized by gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms linked to one or more of the following:

  • motility disruption,
  • visceral hyperacuity,
  • altered epithelial and immunological activity,
  • altered cerebrospinal nervous system processing, and
  • changed intestinal bacteria.

The word “functional” is often employed to explain circumstances in which one or more of the body’s normal processes—such as bowel transit, gut nerve sensitivity, or the mechanism by which the brain controls some of these processes—are impaired.

Contrarily, x-ray, endoscopy, and blood tests show no structural issues [Ref]. Thus, it is determined by the traits of the symptoms and seldom, when necessary, limited tests.

The most prevalent GI problems in the general population are functional GI and motility disorders. According to various estimates, at least 1 in 4 Americans suffer from one of these illnesses.

About 40% of GI disorders addressed by doctors and therapists are caused by these illnesses [Ref].

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Best Antidepressant for Acid Reflux and Gastritis:

The following is a list of over-the-counter antidepressant medications used for the treatment of functional gastrointestinal diseases.

Amitriptyline (Elavil)

This drug belongs to the tricyclic antidepressant class of pharmaceuticals. In the treatment of children with pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), amitriptyline and placebo are equally beneficial.

Unknown mechanisms of amitriptyline action in FGIDs may be related to a change in the sensitivity and motility of the gastrointestinal tract caused by central neuromodulators (5-hydroxytryptamine and noradrenaline).

A low dose of AMT may relieve dyspepsia symptoms and decrease psychological distress [Ref].

How to use Amitriptyline?

Before beginning amitriptyline therapy and each time you receive a refill, read the medication guide that your pharmacist has provided.

As prescribed by your doctor, take this drug by mouth 1 to 4 times daily. Your medical state and treatment response will determine the dosage.

Your doctor might advise you to begin taking this medicine at a low dose and gradually raise it to lessen your risk of adverse effects.

Use this medication only as directed and never up the dosage, frequency, or duration of use.

Side effects of Amitriptyline:

Amitriptyline can have side effects, like all medications, although many people only have moderate or nonexistent side effects.

There could be constipation, tiredness, xerostomia, impaired vision, or trouble peeing [Ref]. As your body adjusts to the medication, some of the frequent adverse effects of amitriptyline will progressively get better.

If any of these adverse effects linger or get worse, consult your physician or pharmacist as soon as possible.

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Desipramine (Norpramin) of Acid Reflux:

Norpramin (desipramine) is a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) used to treat functional gastrointestinal diseases.

TCAs can treat significant psychiatric conditions, which makes it possible for them to treat FGID patients who also have comorbid psychiatric conditions.

Through their anxiolytic impact, they can also alleviate stress-related GI symptoms that worsen and are linked to secondary anxiety, hypervigilance, and other symptoms of anxiety [Ref].

How to use Desipramine?

Take this drug by mouth as prescribed by your doctor, often 1 to 3 times per day, with or without food.

Your medical condition and treatment response will determine the dosage.  You might feel tired or awake after using this drug.

Your doctor may advise you to take the entire amount once daily, either in the morning or at bedtime, depending on how this drug affects you.

Side effects of Desipramine:

The typical side effects of Desipramine are fatigue, lethargy, sedation, weakness, vision problems, constipation, drowsiness, and dry mouth [Ref].

Desipramine can cause serious adverse effects, such as:

  • Inconsistent or uncomfortable menstrual cycles
  • Mental/emotional shifts (e.g., confusion, depression, hallucinations, memory problems)
  • Muscle rigidity
  • Having arm or leg pain, redness, or edema
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Trazodone (Desyrel) for Acid Reflux and Gastritis:

The medication trazodone is a member of the class of medications known as serotonin receptor antagonists & reuptake inhibitors (SARIs).

The antidepressant trazodone has many of the characteristics of the SSRI family of medications while not belonging to that group.

SNRIs may be recommended as the main treatment for uncomfortable FGIDs. They may also be used in individuals with painful FGIDs who failed an initial TCA treatment or had unbearable TCA side effects that prevented them from achieving a potentially therapeutic dose [Ref]. So it is one of the best antidepressants for acid reflux disease.

How to use Trazodone for Acid Reflux?

According to your doctor’s instructions, often once or twice daily, take this medication by mouth after a meal or snack.

If you are taking 1 dose per day and sleepiness is an issue, take it before bed. Take one of your daily doses at bedtime if you take two doses each day.

Your doctor might prescribe you a modest dose of trazodone to start, and then gradually raise it once every three to four days, at most.

Side effects of Trazodone:

Desyrel has the potential to have fatal adverse effects, including regular, rapid, or weak heartbeat. Changing positions makes you feel lightheaded or faint, abnormal bleeding or bruising, and signs of withdrawal.

Anxiety, irritability, and sleep issues are among the withdrawal symptoms. Without consulting your doctor, do not discontinue taking Desyrel.

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Fluoxetine (Prozac) for Acid Reflux and Gastritis:

The class of drugs known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors includes the antidepressant fluoxetine (SSRI).

Fluoxetine is a safe and effective short-term treatment for patients who experience chronic symptoms of FGIDs.

Fluoxetine is more effective than a placebo for reducing abdominal discomfort, easing bloating, boosting bowel movement frequency, and thinning stool consistency [Ref].

How to use Fluoxetine?

The dosage is determined by the patient’s age and the goal of the treatment. The standard oral dose for depression in adults is 20 milligrams (mg) taken in the morning each day.

If symptoms do not go away after a few weeks, they may be increased. It can take up to 4 weeks to observe any effects.

Follow your doctor’s instructions regarding how much medication to take, how frequently, and when. The incorrect dosage can be harmful.

Side effects of Prozac:

Fluoxetine could have adverse effects such as dry mouth, heartburn, yawning, weakness, loss of appetite, weight loss, stuffy nose, headaches, weakness, blisters, hives, Itching, fever, joint discomfort, and swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs.

Tell your physician as soon as possible if any of the following signs are persistent or do not disappear [Ref].

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Conclusion

Fluoxetine and Trazodone are least likely associated with heartburn and have no drug interactions. However, there is no consensus as to which is the best antidepressant for acid reflux and gastritis.

To rate your experience, please rate the following antidepressants in terms of their efficacy in relieving heartburn, gastritis, and acid reflux.

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What do you think?

Written by Ahmed Farhan

I am an Internist practicing medicine for the last fifteen years. Over the years, I have learned that medicine is not about prescribing pills. True medical practice is helping people.
I do prescribe pills as well but the best results I get are when I motivate people to overcome their problems with little changes in their lifestyles.
Since most of my patients are obese and have diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol levels, I am writing at dibesity.com when free.
Dibesity, I know the correct word is diabesity. Ignore this! Be with us.
Also, you can contact me directly at dibesity.com@gmail.com

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